Tag Archives: Wellness Programs

Will H.R. 1313 Allow Wellness Programs to Undermine Your Rights Under GINA? Inquiring Constituents Want to Know…

It’s 2017, and it’s hard to keep track of the reasons to be outraged, but here’s one with special relevance to the genetics community: H.R. 1313, the Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act (alternatively entitled H.R. 666, the Unfortunate Erosion of GINA Act).

There are two main questions we should be asking about H.R. 1313. One, what does it do? And two, why does it exist? For the first, what the law would do (if passed) is allow so-called wellness programs to circumvent the limitations on data collection by employers set out in the genetic non-discrimination act (GINA) and the Americans with disabilities act (ADA). I say so-called wellness programs because in point of fact they have not generally been demonstrated to make people, shall we say, well-er. Which raises the question of why Congress is so keen to make sure they are maintained, but we will get into that later.

Under GINA, employers are not allowed to purchase, request or require genetic information from their employees. The assumption behind this point of law is that employers who had that information might be tempted to try and reduce their exposure to risk by discriminating against those in their risk pool (or their dependents) with increased susceptibility. Alternatively, they might try and use genetic information as a part of decision-making about promotions or assignments. Some of the people attacking the bill have pointed out that attempts to use predictive genetic information are at present likely to be absurdly ineffective and misguided, but this only makes the acts of discrimination more random, not more (or less) nefarious. If they could do it with pinpoint accuracy, it would still be unfair.

Exceptions for wellness programs already exist under GINA, to allow these programs to ask the participant about genetic conditions or genetic testing. As the law stands, the employee must participate voluntarily, and individual identifying information must be collected by a licensed or certified health professional (including, specifically, a genetic counselor) and cannot be shared with the employer except in the aggregate. As for voluntariness, H.R. 1313 would alter this dynamic by sleight of hand – employers are not allowed to charge people more for insurance if they don’t participate, but they are allowed to offer incentives for employees who do participate, and those incentives can be up to 30-50% of their total healthcare contributions. Got that? We’re not charging you more, people who don’t give us your genetic information, we are simply charging the other people less.

 (Sidebar: perhaps we can get corporations to introduce wellness programs that require employees who participate to vaccinate their kids, while the ones who do not pay thousands of dollars more per year in health insurance costs. Vaccines, after all, are the best validated wellness program that we have. Just a thought.)

 The second and most serious charge that has been made about H.R. 1313 is that it would eliminate privacy protections that exist under GINA, and give your employer access to genetic information about employees and their family members. This has been reported in a number of places (in the NY Times here and in STAT here) but is disputed by the NSGC fact sheet circulated on, forebodingly, the ides of March. The bill doesn’t refer to the issue of sharing genetic information specifically, and it seems reasonable to assume that those protections you have under GINA would be in force unless specifically taken away, HOWEVER, there’s obviously room for doubt, given all the doubt. Take home point: the bill should be amended to include a clear message that genetic information is private and cannot be shared with employers (or, for that matter, sold – as commonly happens with wellness programs today).

Which brings me to my second question: why does this bill exist? Identifying the beneficiaries might shed some light on what it is intended to do. Employers might like the bill, if they see it as allowing them to shift health care costs to non-participants via the incentive system (lower costs for some being alternately described as higher costs for others). If we are being pie-eyed optimists, we could imagine that employers are just determined to see you healthy, although in that case they might be put off by the absence of any compelling evidence that these programs work. If we are being conspiracy theorists, we might wonder if some employers see an opportunity to obtain information on the health and health risks of employees and their dependents to which they are denied access under GINA.

Obviously the law is a boon to the ‘wellness’ industry, which Congress is nurturing with this sack of high quality manure while asking in return only that the wellness program not be “highly suspect” as a method to “promote health or prevent disease.” Ah, the old, ‘not highly suspect’ standard.

Perhaps, say you, another beneficiary of the law is the employee who receives a rebate for being healthier. Yes. I’m all for lower health care costs. But since the wellness programs don’t actually make employees healthier, but may identify employees (and their dependents) with more health risks, their benefits come by chasing people who need insurance out of their insurance pool. Companies could keep their own overall costs the same by dropping everyone’s premiums by some intermediate amount, which would help all employees with the added benefit of not being a human rights violation. Food for thought.

On March 8th, the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) came out with a strong statement opposing H.R. 1313, quoting director of science policy Derek Scholes as saying that “If enacted, this bill would force Americans to choose between access to affordable healthcare and keeping their personal genetic and health information private….Employers would be able to coerce employees into providing their genetic and health information and that of their families, even their children.”

The response from NSGC has been more nuanced, prefacing a statement on their concerns about H.R. 1313 with the caveat that “NSGC supports the collection of family health history information.” Without taking an official position on the bill, NSGC has indicated concern about voluntariness and privacy protections, proposing that in its final version, “the bill should explicitly reaffirm the GINA discrimination protections, roll back penalty language altogether, and limit rewards, among others. NSGC would also support further study of the value of wellness programs, and their focus to ensure the programs can indeed positively impact health.

Privately and publicly, I have heard comments from members of the genetic counseling community who are concerned about H.R. 1313. This bill has gathered a fair amount of negative attention and there is a good chance it does not move forward, at least not in its current form. I don’t say this to discourage grass roots activism; in fact it’s the opposite – evidence suggests that public pressure is having an impact. So call your Member of Congress! (we all have our elected representatives on speed dial by now, right?). Here’s a quick summary of three points worth making:

  1. Participation in any program that includes gathering genetic or family health history information on the participant and/or family members should be truly voluntary, and should not be associated with substantial rebates or incentives.
  1. Wellness programs should be explicitly required to conform with the privacy protections for genetic and family health history information that have been established by GINA and the ADA. Congress should pass no laws that erode or diminish these important civil rights protections.
  1. Laws creating special exemptions or accommodations for wellness programs should include a standard for wellness programs based on an objectively assessed, documented record of improved health outcomes.

 

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