As a Genetic Counselor, Would You Go Public With Your Genome?

A Canadian version of the Personal Genome Project (PGP) was launched earlier this month. This is an initiative that, for one key reason, is likely to have a rippling effect for the genetic counseling profession. Modelled after and in collaboration with George Church and his group at Harvard, the project aims to recruit 100,000 volunteers to have their whole genome sequenced and posted publicly online for the advancement of research. As someone who has followed the US Personal Genome Project from the outset, I’m thrilled that Canadians will now be able to participate in this important research.

So why is the Canadian version of this project so important for genetic counselors specifically? Because the first participant (whom the media has aptly named Canuck One) to bravely volunteer to “bare her genomic soul” and forgo any form of anonymity while doing it, is a genetic counselor. Jill  Davies and her involvement with PGP-Canada was profiled in The Globe & Mail (one of Canada’s largest national newspapers) earlier this month.

Globe and Mail PGP-1

In full disclosure, Jill Davies is a close colleague and friend (and also a previous guest contributor to The DNA Exchange). The Medcan Clinic genetics program has been involved in the PGP-Canada project from the outset, and therefore it is no coincidence that Jill happens to be participant number 1. But it is also precisely the fact that she is a genetic counselor that the PGP team was keen to have Jill step up to the plate. Who knows the potential implications—clinical, ethical, legal and social—of whole genome sequencing better than a GC? Beyond immersing herself into her work (quite literally), Jill’s participation will undoubtedly help raise awareness of the genetic counseling profession, which is something that I think should be celebrated.

Not surprisingly, with the potential to have my own whole genome sequenced hitting closer to home, I’ve been thinking a lot about whether this is something I would go through with, and if not—why?

The Globe & Mail has done an excellent job in asking the general public this very same question. In conjunction with the official start of the PGP-Canada project, the newspaper launched a widespread interactive media series — The DNA Dilemma—running from December 8 to December 22. This is one of the biggest and most comprehensive genomics-related media series I’ve seen. It is really worth the look at the articles and commentary. They have even developed a genomics game: Win, Lose or Genome?

By far the most interesting component to the series for me is the Infographic-type Poll on whether people would choose to have their genomes sequenced. Of the 1000+ respondents so far, a whopping 80% say they would have sequencing, and 70% believe the benefits outweigh the risks (you can filter the results based on age, gender, location etc). As a genetic counselor I find these numbers fascinating (and surprisingly high).

Globe and Mail Poll

My hunch is that if we polled GCs specifically, this number would be lower. There are so many interesting questions about why this might be—is it because we are more informed? Is it because we are a self-selected group who are more attuned (and potentially concerned about) the ethical issues associated with genetics to begin with? If I had the skills to create such a beautifully intricate poll as the one above I would, but I’ll have to make do with the standard DNA Exchange poll to test my theory. So—what do you say? Would you participate in the PGP?

3 Comments

Filed under Allie Janson Hazell

3 responses to “As a Genetic Counselor, Would You Go Public With Your Genome?

  1. Shelley Kennedy

    Thanks for this piece Allie – I’m overseas so it’s nice to have a heads up regarding coverage of Genetics in Canadian media sources.
    I suspect the high numbers in the Infographic Type Poll represent a selection bias? Those reading the article have self-selected to be interested in Genetics and are therefore more likely to be willing, hypothetically, to participate in whole genome sequencing. A random sample of the population might give us a more representative response.

    • Thanks for your response Kelly. Obviously we have to take these types of polls with a grain of salt– including polls we post on The DNA Exchange! Interestingly, if you sift through the 100+ reader comments on the original article (“Would you make your DNA and health data public if it may help cure disease” December 7, 2012) you’ll see that the vast majority are NOT supportive of participation in the PGP. This at least shows us that there are a lot of people reading the articles who are not in favour of the idea of WGS or sharing data for research purposes.

      Maybe people who are interested in participating in the PGP are more likely to respond to a Poll versus comment on an article and visa versa– although I’m guessing we’ll never really know :)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s